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Rural casualty crashes in NSW: A comparison of two major arterial roads and two main highways

Alian, S, Baker, R, Wood, S (Peer reviewed)

Road Environment

ARSC conference 2016

This research considers the interaction between road geometry and driver behaviour and its impact on change of crash rates for day/night and different driving directions. An empirical locationspecific approach is used to compare the results between two types of rural roads. The crash data is investigated for two major arterial roads (Kings Highway and Waterfall Way) and two main highways (Pacific and Princess Highways) in NSW. The results suggest that the risk of crashing is higher at night and during the day on arterial roads and varies according to travel direction. Driver gender, age and speed are all significantly different between day/night. Higher crash rates at night might be due to speed and fatigue, and more crashes during the day on arterial roads might because of the complexity of the interaction between road geometry and driver behaviour on sinuous sections of the road.